Chukwuemeka ODUMEGWU OJUKWU, 19332011 (aged 78 years)

Name
Chukwuemeka /ODUMEGWU OJUKWU/
Given names
Chukwuemeka
Surname
ODUMEGWU OJUKWU
Birth November 4, 1933 24
Occupation
Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra

Note: Chukwuemeka "Emeka" Odumegwu-Ojukwu 4 November 1933 – 26 November 2011 was a Nigerian military officer and politician who served as the military governor of the Eastern Region of Nigeria in 1966 and the leader of the breakaway Republic of Biafra from 1967 to 1970. He was active as a politician from 1983 to 2011 when he died aged 78
Battles/wars
Nigerian Civil War / Nigerian Biafran War Full Video Raw war footage Documentary
from 1967 to
Source: Wikipedia
Date of entry in original source: September 11, 2020
Quality of data: primary evidence
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Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
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from October 19, 1963 to October 16, 1964 (aged 30 years)

36th President of the United States
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November 22, 1963 (aged 30 years)

Death of a fatherSir Louis Phillip Odumegwu OJUKWU OBE
1966 (aged 32 years)
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37th President of the United States
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January 20, 1969 (aged 35 years)

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January 20, 1977 (aged 43 years)

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January 20, 1981 (aged 47 years)

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Death of a wifeNjideka Onyekwelu
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from May 11, 2010 to July 13, 2016 (aged 82 years)

Death November 26, 2011 (aged 78 years)
Burial March 2, 2012 (3 months after death)
Religion: Christianity
Nationality
Nigeria

Family with parents
father
Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu
19091966
Birth: 1909Obiuno, Umudim, Nnewi, Nnewi North L.G.A, Anambra State, Nigeria
Death: 1966Nkalagu, Ishielu L.G.A, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
Family with Elizabeth Okoli
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
ex-wife
Elizabeth Okoli
Family with Njideka Onyekwelu
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
ex-wife
son
Chukwuemeka Odumegwu (Jnr.) OJUKWU
son
Okigbo OJUKWU
daughter
Mmegha OJUKWU
Family with Stella Onyeador
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
ex-wife
Stella Onyeador
daughter
Ebele OJUKWU
Family with Mary Theresa
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
wife
Mary Theresa
child
Tenny HAMAN
Family with Victoria
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
wife
Victoria
Family with Bianca Odinaka Olivia ONOH
himself
Chukwuemeka Ojukwu
19332011
Birth: November 4, 1933 24Zungeru, Niger State, Nigeria
Nationality: Nigeria
Occupation: Nigerian military officer and Politician, 1st President of Biafra
Death: November 26, 2011London, United Kingdom
wife
Bianca Odinaka Olivia ONOH
daughter
Chineme OJUKWU
son
Afam OJUKWU
son
Nwachukwu OJUKWU
Dr Onuorah + Elizabeth Okoli
partner’s partner
Dr Onuorah
ex-wife
Elizabeth Okoli
Dr. MENDS + Njideka Onyekwelu
partner’s partner
Dr. MENDS
ex-wife
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Date of entry in original source: December 8, 2012
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Date of entry in original source: December 10, 2012
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Occupation

Chukwuemeka "Emeka" Odumegwu-Ojukwu 4 November 1933 – 26 November 2011 was a Nigerian military officer and politician who served as the military governor of the Eastern Region of Nigeria in 1966 and the leader of the breakaway Republic of Biafra from 1967 to 1970. He was active as a politician from 1983 to 2011 when he died aged 78

Note

Nigerian military officer and politician who served as the military governor of the Eastern Region of Nigeria in 1966 and the leader of the breakaway Republic of Biafra from 1967 to 1970.

Note

HE had a tough and oracular mien. The more you tried to understand him, the more difficult and complex he seemed. Not many, especially the men folk, could decode him easily. But beneath those deportments were his charm, élan, oratory.

While his fellow men found him a bit impenetrable, the ladies seemed to know his genetic code and could conveniently decode or deconstruct him. He was such a dashing young man with an aura that was simply irresistible. Little wonder he cut a dash among charming and beautiful women.

Those were the portraits of the enigma called Dim Chukwu Odimegwu Ojukwu, the late Biafran warlord, the People’s General, The Lion of the Tribe of Biafra, the Generals’ General, Ezeigbo Gburugburu, as he was known in his commune.

Ojukwu was not one you could derisively label a lecher, yet he was a lady’s man: affectionate, romantic and pampering He was believed to be a connoisseur of beautiful women. Women, it was claimed, inspired his thought but never rule his life.

Questions were often posed by women as to why Ojukwu was so adored by not just women but beautiful women. But the posers were barely answered before they found themselves dotting around or hankering after him. No woman could wave aside his charisma, elegance and seductive poise.

The late Biafran hero embodied all that a woman craved for and much else. A patrician pedigree and upbringing, an Oxford education and a suave outlook were qualities that could not be discounted. Like nectar to butterflies, so was Ikemba to women who knew what they wanted.

In his interaction with women and romantic epistles to them, he was believed to have sumptuously deployed his rich repertoire of poetry and comforting words. Those who came his way, he swept them off their feet with his flowery vibes and verve, and they fell a dime a dozen.

He was said to have displayed his absolute love for beautiful and brainy ladies. It was also said that “you never really stand a chance as a woman if the Ikemba decides that you are really going be his love interest…. You know Ikemba, he’s ladies’ man…,” Bianca, his widow, had revealed in an interview.

Ojukwu’s disposition was believed to have been informed by a notion in the military that most military officers who trained at Sandhurst Military Academy, England, were weaned on a precept that they must remember that they were only sure of ‘today’, as they may be gone tomorrow. This kind of orientation in the army, especially among the top military echelon, is believed to encourage them to seek good companies among beautiful ladies whenever they have the opportunity to relax, as ‘tomorrow may never come.’ And Ojukwu, a ladies’ man, had more than his fair share.

From Elizabeth Okoli, daughter of Nigeria’s first Post-Master General whose marriage to the Ikemba Nnewi lasted for just two years, to Njideka Onyekwelu who had earlier been married to a certain Dr. Mends, before tying the nuptial knot with Ojukwu; Victoria who he met in Cote d’Ivoire; Stella Onyeador, chief bridesmaid during Njideka’s marriage and finally to Bianca, they all saw in Ojukwu a Romeo or King of love in whom they were well pleased.

Following the revelation emanating from the reading of his controversial will, of a lovechild, Tenny Haman, The Nation tried to seek the views of some of the late Ikemba’s associates and confidants on his love life as well as the different women in his life.

Asked to offer his perspective, Colonel Joseph Achuzia, a Biafran Commander and confidant of the Biafran warlord said he would not be dragged into taking a peek at the life of his friend, who he said should be allowed to rest in peace.

His words: The person who you are referring to was my personal and dear friend. Today, many people who did not know him are all out to caricature him. Not even his children understand him.

“It will be wrong for me to join the fray in caricaturing him or saying anything uncomplimentary about him until we understand the forces manipulating what is going on. That is why I cannot answer your question.

“Whether it is about his love life or lovechild, it all boils down to the same thing. I know everything about the man you are asking about. I know the women he married and those he did not marry.

“We as a soldiers who were involved in the war, we know all the girls who came either as friends or something else. It is an intimate knowledge which I am not ready to share or talk about. I would not like a situation where I am gone tomorrow only for me to be dissected for what people will describe as my amorous life.”

Offering an insight into the women in Ojukwu’s life, first cousin to the Biafran warlord, Chief Anthony Nnadozie Udemefuna Ojukwu, 73, while admitting that their family is known for polygamy, had hinted that there was always something different each of his wives wanted in him: “Look at Bianca; what she wanted in a man might be very different from what Njideka or Stella wanted. But what I want to assure you is that these four women were alike. They were all beautiful women.

“Emeka loved beautiful things and beautiful cars. He was a man of courage and was handsome, which was an irresistible combination. Ojukwu married four wives in all, but he was married to each of them one at a time. He married early. You know he was a young, rich and handsome man, with a lot of prospects.”

The many wives of Ojukwu:

In what would mark Ojukwu’s metamorphosis from boy to man was his marriage to his first wife Elizabeth Okoli from ‘Nnukwu Awka’, Anambra State in 1956. Elizabeth was a senior nursing sister by profession and daughter of Nigeria’s first Post-Master General. He was said to have wedded her in court. The marriage, however, suffered a setback, leading to the couple going their separate ways in 1958.

Njideka

Among the late Ikemba’s numerous wives who he married after each separation or divorce was Njideka Onyekwelu, his second wife. They were married in 1964. Njideka had earlier been married to one Dr. Mends, with whom she had a set of twins, a boy and a girl, before they separated.

According to an insider account, Njideka and Ojukwu were said to have met through their fathers who were friends and business partners. After their first encounter, they met again three years later at a tube station in London. A relationship ensued soon afterwards and was subsequently cemented through marriage, which produced three children, two of whom were named Emeka (Jnr) and Okigbo.

Describing the kind of husband the late Ojukwu was, Njideka had said: “He is just a very kind man, very polite, not intrusive. He cared less about what happens in the kitchen; he just settles for whatever you offered him. He respected me and my opinion a lot. Later, when the children got across to him, he would ask them what my opinion was on issues and I loved him immensely in return.”

Njideka and Ojukwu, according to a source, had what was called ordinance wedding then and the reception was in the family house, Eastern House in Lagos. Ojukwu married Njideka when he was the 5th Battalion Commander and they stayed on till he was appointed the governor of Eastern Region. The marriage reportedly ended in separation in Cote d’Ivoire when Ojukwu decided to take a second wife. Njideka was alleged to have left him angrily.

Victoria

A ‘hot commodity’ he turned out to be. Just as one woman was walking out of his life, another was making her way into his life, as if to fulfill the scriptural provision that ‘it is not good for a man to be alone’.

Ojukwu’s taste for ravishing beauties was never in doubt. But it was during his exile in Cote d’Ivoire that it assumed a new height. That was where Victoria stepped in to keep the Ikemba’s marital life aglow.

Ojukwu reportedly met Victoria in Cote d’Ivoire. They remained married till the early 80’s when Ojukwu was granted a state pardon by the then Nigeria’s president, Alhaji Usman Shagari.

Stella Onyeador

As the affair with Victoria began to grow cold, the Eze Nd’Igbo Gburugburu had a replacement waiting in the wings in beautiful Stella Onyeador, sister of society impresario, late Angela Onyeador. According to reports, Ojukwu and Onyeador nestled together for about 10 years without an offspring to show for it.

The two lovebirds, it was gathered, later had a spat and went to court over custody of a girl-child they adopted while in Cote d’Ivoire. Ojukwu eventually won the custody brawl as the court ruled that under French law, a woman is not eligible to adopt babies, which was the norm in Cote d’Ivoire then.

Welcome Bianca

Each time the curtain was about to be drawn on a dying relationship, there was another lurking in the corner. With the death knell finally sounded on the 10-year-old romance with Stella, ravishing and delectable Bianca stepped in.

The story of how the Ojukwu met Bianca is well documented. The story goes that for the love Ojukwu felt for Bianca, he became a sonneteer, writing sweet feelings with pencil and painting same with crayons to send to her. This was in spite of the wide gap in their ages. But age posed no blockade for his love for Bianca.

Ojukwu was said to have been one of the high dignitaries at the Silverbird beauty pageant where Bianca was crowned. He came prepared. According to a source, he wrote a love note to her with a flower inside.

Ojukwu reportedly defied all the camp rules for Bianca. According to the rule, no man courts a queen, and no queen dates a man while reigning. But both of them fell for each other. Bianca refused to let go of Ojukwu and sacrificed her Most Beautful Girl in Nigeria. She also went against her father because of Ojukwu.

But Bianca was not alone in offering Ojukwu her queenly love. She was in fierce competition with other ladies who desired his attention. There was the late Governor Sam Mbakwe’s daughter, one Barrister Onwuelo’s daughter from Nnewi and another beautiful lady.

Ojukwu’s marriage to Bianca was arguably the most celebrated celebrity marriage in Nigeria till date. Their controversial romance was a national talking point in the early 90s and reports had suggested that she was dethroned after her romance was exposed.

Bianca had spoken of their relationship thus: “We have been into a relationship since 1989 but we got married formally on November 12, 1994. We have been together for over 20 years, because we had been living together since 1989. I was 22 and he was in his mid-50s when we started. It was not your conventional relationship.

“Looking back now, I certainly realise that I was very young at that time, but it didn’t seem to matter, because we had so much in common and we had good communication. The gap was not there in our day-to-day interactions.

“People thought the relationship was bizarre because of the age difference but it’s only when I look back now that I have children of my own that I realised that it was rather unusual.

“I don’t know whether I would classify it as being in love. I just knew that the difference tended to melt away when compared to the common grounds that we had. We had a similar background and we had so much to talk about. We had common interests and we just did a lot of things together. We went to see plays at the theatre. We went on vacations and there was just no disparity in our interaction.”

What the late Ikemba loved, he held so dear. He loved his women and cared for them. While he allowed other women to walk out of his life, his love for Bianca was so uncommon that even in death, he is not ready to let go. Little wonder he caused to be inserted in his will a clause that would keep Bianca bonded to him until they reunite in heaven. Indeed, the

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Note: Chukwuemeka ODUMEGWU OJUKWU and his two kids Circa 1972
Biography of Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu

Chukwuemeka "Emeka" Odumegwu-Ojukwu (4 November 1933[1] – 26 November 2011[2]) was a Nigerian military officer and politician who served as the military governor of the Eastern Region of Nigeria in 1966 and the leader of the breakaway Republic of Biafra from 1967 to 1970. He was active as a politician from 1983 to 2011, when he died aged 78.[3]

Early life and education

Chukwuemeka "Emeka" Odumegwu-Ojukwu was born on 4 November 1933 at Zungeru in northern Nigeria to Sir Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu, an Igbo businessman from present-day NnewiAnambra State in south-eastern Nigeria. Sir Louis was in the transport business; he took advantage of the business boom during World War II to become one of the richest men in Nigeria. He began his educational career in Lagos, southwestern Nigeria.[4]

Emeka Ojukwu started his secondary school education at CMS Grammar School, Lagos aged 10 in 1943.[5] He later transferred to King's College, Lagos in 1944 where he was involved in a controversy leading to his brief imprisonment for assaulting a British teacher who put down a student strike action that he was a part of.[6] This event generated widespread coverage in local newspapers.[4] At 13, his father sent him to the United Kingdom to continue his education, first at Epsom College and later at Lincoln College, Oxford University, where he earned a master's degree in History. He returned to colonial Nigeria in 1956.[7]

Early career

Ojukwu joined the civil service in Eastern Nigeria as an Administrative Officer at Udi, in present-day Enugu State. In 1957, after two years of working with the colonial civil service and seeking to break away from his father's influence over his civil service career,[8] he left and joined the military initially enlisting as a non-commissioned officer (NCO) in Zaria.[9][10][11]

Ojukwu's decision to enlist as an NCO was forced by his father's (Sir Louis) pulling of political strings with the then Governor-General of Nigeria (John Macpherson) to prevent Emeka from getting an officer-cadetship.[12] Sir Louis and Governor-General Macpherson believed Emeka would not stick to the gruelling NCO schedule however Emeka persevered. After an incident in which Ojukwu corrected a drill sergeant's mispronunciation of the safety catch of the Lee-Enfield .303 rifle, the British Depot Commander recommended Emeka for an officer's commission.[12]

From Zaria, Emeka proceeded first, to the Royal West African Frontier Force Training School in Teshie, Ghana and next, to Eaton Hall where he received his commission in March 1958 as a 2nd Lieutenant.[13][14][15]

He was one of the first and few university graduates to receive an army commission.[16] He later attended Infantry School in Warminster, the Small Arms School in Hythe. Upon completion of further military training, he was assigned to the Army's Fifth Battalion in Kaduna.[13]

At that time, the Nigerian Military Forces had 250 officers and only 15 were Nigerians. There were 6,400 other ranks, of which 336 were British. After serving in the United Nations’ peacekeeping force in the Congo, under Major General Johnson Thomas Aguiyi-Ironsi, Ojukwu was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in 1964 and posted to Kano, where he was in charge of the 5th Battalion of the Nigerian Army.

1966 coups and events leading to the Nigerian Civil War

Lieutenant-Colonel Ojukwu was in Kano, northern Nigeria, when Major Patrick Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu on 15 January 1966 executed and announced the bloody military coup in Kaduna, also in northern Nigeria. It is to Ojukwu's credit that the coup lost much steam in the north,[17] where it had succeeded. Lt. Col. Odumegwu-Ojukwu supported the forces loyal to the Supreme Commander of the Nigerian Armed Forces, Major-General Aguiyi-Ironisi. Major Nzeogwu was in control of Kaduna, but the coup had failed in other parts of the country.[18]

Aguiyi-Ironsi took over the leadership of the country and thus became the first military head of state. On Monday, 17 January 1966, he appointed military governors for the four regions. Lt. Col. Odumegwu-Ojukwu was appointed Military Governor of Eastern Region. Others were: Lt.-Cols Hassan Usman Katsina (North), Francis Adekunle Fajuyi (West), and David Akpode Ejoor (Mid West). These men formed the Supreme Military Council with Brigadier B.A.O. Ogundipe, Chief of Staff, Supreme Headquarters, Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, Chief of Staff Army HQ, Commodore J. E. A. Wey, Head of Nigerian Navy, Lt. Col. George T. Kurubo, Head of Air Force, Col. Sittu Alao.

By 29 May, the 1966 anti-Igbo pogrom started. This presented problems for Odumegwu Ojukwu, as he did everything in his power to prevent reprisals and even encouraged people to return, as assurances for their safety had been given by his supposed[19] colleagues up north and out west.

On 29 July 1966, a group of officers, including Majors Murtala MuhammedTheophilus Yakubu Danjuma, and Martin Adamu, led the majority Northern soldiers in a mutiny that later developed into a "Counter-Coup" or "July Rematch".[20] The coup failed in the South-Eastern part of Nigeria where Ojukwu was the military Governor, due to the effort of the brigade commander and hesitation of northern officers stationed in the region (partly due to the mutiny leaders in the East being Northern whilst being surrounded by a large Eastern population).

The Supreme Commander General Aguiyi-Ironsi and his host Colonel Fajuyi were abducted and killed in Ibadan. On acknowledging Ironsi's death, Ojukwu insisted that the military hierarchy be preserved. In that case, the most senior army officer after Ironsi was Brigadier Babafemi Ogundipe, should take over leadership, not Colonel Gowon (the coup plotters choice), however, the leaders of the counter-coup insisted that Colonel Gowon be made head of state. Both Gowon and Ojukwu were of the same rank in the Nigeria Army then (Lt. Colonel). Ogundipe could not muster enough force in Lagos to establish his authority as soldiers (Guard Battalion) available to him were under Joseph Nanven Garba who was part of the coup, it was this realisation that led Ogundipe to opt-out. Thus, Ojukwu's insistence could not be enforced by Ogundipe unless the coup plotters agreed (which they did not).[21] The fall out from this led to a standoff between Ojukwu and Gowon leading to the sequence of events that resulted in the Nigerian civil war.[22][23]

Biafra

In January 1967, the Nigerian military leadership went to Aburi, Ghana, for a peace conference hosted by General Joseph Ankrah. The implementation of the agreements reached Aburi fell apart upon the leaderships return to Nigeria and on 30 May 1967, as a result of this, Colonel Odumegwu-Ojukwu declared Eastern Nigeria a sovereign state to be known as Biafra:[24]

Having mandated me to proclaim on your behalf, and in your name, that Eastern Nigeria be a sovereign independent Republic, now, therefore I, Lieutenant Colonel Chukwuemeka Odumegwu-Ojukwu, Military Governor of Eastern Nigeria, by the authority, and pursuant to the principles recited above, do hereby solemnly proclaim that the territory and region known as and called Eastern Nigeria together with her continental shelf and territorial waters, shall, henceforth, be an independent sovereign state of the name and title of The Republic of Biafra.[25]

On 6 July 1967, Gowon declared war[26] and attacked Biafra. In addition to the Aburi Accord that tried to avoid the war, there was also the Niamey Peace Conference under President Hamani Diori (1968) and the OAU-sponsored Addis Ababa Conference (1968) under the chairmanship of Emperor Haile Selassie. This was the final effort by Generals Ojukwu and Gowon to settle the conflict via diplomacy.[27]

After three years of fighting and starvation, a hole appeared in the Biafran front lines and this was exploited by the Nigerian military. As it became obvious that the war was lost, Ojukwu was convinced to leave the country to avoid assassination.[28] On 9 January 1970, he handed over power to his second in command, Chief of General Staff Major-General Philip Effiong, and left for Ivory Coast, where President Félix Houphouët-Boigny – who had recognised Biafra on 14 May 1968 – granted him political asylum.[29][30]

During the war, some members of the July 1966 alleged coup plot and Major Victor Banjo were executed for treason with the approval of Ojukwu, the Biafran Supreme commander. Major Ifeajuna was one of those executed.[31] Nigerian Biafran War Full Video Raw war footage Documentary

Death

On 26 November 2011, Ikemba Odumegwu Ojukwu died in the United Kingdom after a brief illness, aged 78. The Nigerian Army accorded him the highest military accolade and conducted a funeral parade for him in Abuja, Nigeria on 27 February 2012, the day his body was flown back to Nigeria from London before his burial on Friday, 2 March. He was buried in a newly built mausoleum in his compound at Nnewi. Before his final interment, he had an elaborate weeklong funeral ceremony in Nigeria alongside Chief Obafemi Awolowo, whereby his body was carried around the five Eastern states, Imo, Abia, Enugu, Ebonyi, Anambra, including the nation's capital, Abuja. Memorial services and public events were also held in his honour in several places across Nigeria, including Lagos and Niger State, his birthplace, and as far away as Dallas, Texas, United States.[32] His funeral was attended by ex-President Goodluck Jonathan of Nigeria and ex-President Jerry Rawlings of Ghana among other personalities.[33][34]