Nnewi , 15301607 (aged 77 years)

Nnewi
Name
Nnewi //
Given names
Nnewi

Third Chief of Nnewi

Birth 1530 27 22
Alias
Ikenga

MarriageIfediokpu View this family
Yes

Birth of a brotherIsu
1532 (aged 2 years)

Birth of a brotherOrifite
1534 (aged 4 years)

Death of a paternal grandmotherIfe-Enweugwu
1535 (aged 5 years)

Birth of a brotherIchi
1536 (aged 6 years)

Birth of a sonOkpala
1560 (aged 30 years)

Birth of a sonDigbo
1563 (aged 33 years)
Birth of a sonUru
1565 (aged 35 years)

Birth of a sonEze Eke
1567 (aged 37 years)

Birth of a sonEze Ekweludikeonwu
1569 (aged 39 years)

Birth of a sonNnagha
1571 (aged 41 years)

Coronation
Reign
from 1577 to 1607 (aged 77 years)
Death of a sonEze Ekweludikeonwu
1577 (aged 47 years)

Death of a fatherIkenga
1577 (aged 47 years)

Birth of a grandsonOtolo
1581 (aged 51 years)
Birth of a grandsonEze Kwuabo
1582 (aged 52 years)

Death of a motherIfite
1587 (aged 57 years)

Death 1607 (aged 77 years)

Religion
Odinani

Family with parents
father
Ikenga
15031577
Birth: 1503 26 20
Death: 1577
mother
Marriage Marriage
himself
Nnewi
15301607
Birth: 1530 27 22Nnewi North L.G.A, Anambra State, Nigeria
Death: 1607
3 years
younger brother
3 years
younger brother
3 years
younger brother
Family with Ifediokpu
himself
Nnewi
15301607
Birth: 1530 27 22Nnewi North L.G.A, Anambra State, Nigeria
Death: 1607
wife
Marriage Marriage
son
15601629
Birth: 1560 30 25
Death: 1629
4 years
son
15631635
Birth: 1563 33 28Nnewi North L.G.A, Anambra State, Nigeria
Death: 1635
3 years
son
3 years
son
3 years
son
3 years
son
NameView

Third Chief of Nnewi

Note

people often refer to their town or themselves as Anaedo thinking that the name is exclusive to them but they are wrong. "Anaedo" or Edoland is used to describe three villages that have now grown into towns namely: Nnewi (the son of Ikenga), Oraifite and Ichi, all in Anambra state. Edo was in reality the name of a woman married by Agbaja who begot Ikenga the father of Nnewi or Ewimnga, Oraifite and Ichi. Edo was a native of Abatete in Idemili area in Anambra state. Edo was so caring a mother that her children made her a god upon death. It was claimed that she appeared to them in a dream and demanded that shrines be built in her name. She also dictated how she would be worshipped. She also enunciated her commandments and abhorence known as "nsọ Edo". That was how the children of Agbaja raised their mother Edo to a god leaving their father as a lowly mortal. Agbaja had no shrine in his name except the Agbaja Customary Court located at the present day village of Umudim, Nnewi named after him by Major Moorehouse, a colonial masters in 1906. This serves as a lesson to men who struggle for relevance with the mothers of their children. You can't win in the long term. Children tend to deify their mothers instead of their fathers. From time immemorial, mothers have been supreme. That's the meaning of "Nneka". Agbaja's children, guided by divine instructions or out of love, had made Edo, their mother, the supreme deity in their communities that have grown into towns. Etomologically speaking, "Ana" in Anaedo means “the land” while "Edo" is the "mother of Ikenga, Oraifite and Ichi". It is now better known as a deity than a woman that lived. The main Edo shrine is in Nnewi and is located around the famous Nnewi Motor & Motorcycles Spareparts Market. In fact, the market is sited on the Edo's virgin forest known as Agbọedo. “Agbọ” means "thick virgin forest" usually belonging to a deity. Anaedo means Edoland or that entire land area inhabited by the descendants or children of Edo. Please note that Ikenga had many children some of who are Isu and Nnewi. Isu was the first son of Ikenga but was replaced by Nnewi at a time. The children of Ikenga are now subsumed under the Nnewi town. So, Anaedo covers Nnewi, Ichi and Oraifite. Anaedo or Agbaja refers to Nnewi, Oraifite and Ichi as an entity. Even though Edo was deified or made a god upon death, every Nnewi, Oraifite and Ichi citizen belongs to Edo. Therefore, it a sheer ignorance for someone to deem Anaedo as idolatry. It is rather a motherland. This practice of answering mother's name is easily still found in some aboriginal Anaedo kindreds where Ụmụnna or extended families are called by there mothers' names. The ruling ụmụnna in Otolo and Nnewi is called Ụmụonyebuchi named after Onyebuchi, their mother. Same is true for popular Ụmụnwakanwa family named after Nwakanwa their mother. The two aforementioned women were two out of the many wives of Ezeoguine, the late Obi of Nnewi from whom Igwe Orizu III and this writer descended. Notwithstanding their religious inclination, all descendants of Edo are called Ụmụ Anaedo because they share in the common heritage of Edo, their ancestors' caring mother. This is our history and should be known and be told to our children. ———————————————————------- anayonwosu@icloud.com Ikenga Ezenwegbu

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Beatrice Uchenna AGBA (1951–2017) Mrs Oliaku … (–2020) Chukwu Ebuka Francis EJIOFOR (1989–2017) Virginia Ukamaka AGUSIONU (1941–2017) Dr Abyssinia Akweke Nwafor ORIZU (1914–1999) Chukwuemeka ODUMEGWU OJUKWU (1933–2011) Emmanuel IFEZUE (1951–2017) Dr. Cletus Madubugwu IBETO (1952–) Lawrence Okeke Okeke (–) Margaret EKPO (1914–2006) Ogechukwu Ejikeme (1944–2015) Nkiruka Anthonia Ikeanyionwu (1995–2015) Kenneth OKONKWO (1968–) His Royal Highness Igwe Dr. Kenneth Onyeneke ORIZU III (1925–) Lawrence Chukwuemeka NWANYA (1930–2017) Naamah … (2464 BCE–2360 BCE) Enebeli ELEBUWA (1947–2012) Henry Arvo Okenwa NZEWI (1993–2016) Igwe Peter Chukwuma Ezenwa (1926–2018) Late Sir (Engr) Amb. Onyenekwe (1945–2016) Japheth NOAH (1557 BCE–) Julius Onogaya Ukakwara Durueshikwudu (1951–2016) Sir Francis Akanu IBIAM KCMG, KBE (1906–1995) Emeka Ike (1967–) Christiana Afiachukwu AKACHUKWU (1959–2017) Ngozi Bridget Igwebuike (1944–2019) Maria ANYANWU (1923–2003) Chief Benjamin Nnamdi AZIKIWE (1904–1996) Mabel Ekoma AYADIKWOR (1964–2012) Catherine Ikwuka OKOYE (1948–2013) Shem NOAH (2202 BCE–1602 BCE) Chief Benjamin Nnamdi AZIKIWE (1904–1996) Justus ESIRI (–2013)